The Montana Conservationist September 14

Greetings, readers! It seems all of our collective prayers for rain may be answered this weekend, which means this fire season may be coming to an end. But you know what’s not coming to an end? TMC, that’s what. Here’s this week’s issue:

  • Reports have come in that some of the hay donated to producers affected by Lodgepole fire may contain noxious / invasive weeds. DNRC has some advice for how to prevent the spread if you received that hay.
  • In Kansas, a group of farmers buried their dirty laundry in the name of science. Turns out, the speed at which your tidy-whities degrade can be a great indication of soil health.
  • And prisoners in some Western prisons are giving up the license plate game and turning into sagebrush farmers, all in the name of conservation.
  • Our own Ian Cavigli has an article about the role bats play in pollination, and one very important product they help make. (Hint: it tastes great in a glass with a salted rim).
  • A B.C. coal mine’s water treatment plant failure has many in Northwest Montana concerned about the selenium flowing into Lake Koocanusa, and the health & fisheries effects of the chemical.
  • Flooding from Hurricane Harvey caused a huge amount of damage, and now it’s up to us to figure out what went wrong, and how we can prevent similar flooding in the future, and in other places. We’ve got two articles discussing different aspects of the problem, and what we can learn.
  • And in the summer of disaster, FEMA has approved funding to assist with firefighting costs associated with five Montana wildfires.
  • Finally, we introduce you to SWCDM’s newest employee, Jalyn Kauzer, who has replaced Kelsey Molloy as a SGI Range Conservationist in Malta.

All of that, plus the details that matter. Read this week’s Montana Conservationist: TMC 2017-09-13